Wednesday, January 9, 1991

Archbishop of Milwaukee Would Ordain Married Man

Peter Steinfels reported in The New York Times, January 9, 1991.
In reviewing solutions for the clergy shortage, Archbishop Weakland rejected closing or merging parishes to form "mega-parishes." ...

He also rejected using fewer priests to serve many parishes as "circuit riders." ...

Replacing Sunday Mass with laity-led Scripture readings, prayer services or distribution of communion consecrated previously by a priest were solutions to the clergy shortage that "frighten me," the Archbishop said. 'Priesthod [sic] Is Essential'

If these practice lasted "for many years -- even a generation -- I do not see how the Catholic identity could be maintained." he said. ...

...

In his letter, Archbishop Weakland asked what should be done in the future for a "priestless parish" that demonstrated its vitality by gathering on Sunday even in the absence of a priest, by conducting a strong education program, by reaching out to others with works of charity and by trying to promote the celibate priesthood.

If such a parish were likely to be deprived for many years of regular Mass on Sundays because of the priest shortage, Archbishop Weakland said, "I would be willing to help the community surface a qualified candidate for ordained priesthood -- even a married man -- and, without raising false expectations or unfounded hopes for him or the community, present such a candidate" to the Pope "for light and guidance." ...

Thursday, January 3, 1991

Soul Searching

Anna Quindlen in "Public & Private" in The New York Times, January 3, 1991, on "three wise men", including,
Archbishop Rembert Weakland of Milwaukee, who established discussion groups for women to talk about abortion, was asked if he would muzzle himself after the Vatican barred a Catholic university from giving him an honorary doctorate. He couldn't imagine keeping quiet, he said, "unless you take out my tongue."